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There are so many things to consider before purchasing a condominium. It is a great lifestyle, you can have a beautiful communal lawn with flowers and great landscaping and never use a lawn mower and you can have a swimming pool and never have to worry with maintaining water quality. Yes, condominium living can be a great life choice at a very affordable price. For a small monthly fee, most things are managed through a homeowner’s association taking most of the stress off the individual owners and expense is spread out. Buying a condo is very similar to purchasing a home, getting a mortgage, hiring a Realtor or getting a foundation inspection. Learn more here!

The inspection can be an important from those other aspects of purchasing a home. A better inspection of your home can uncover easily the hazards or anything that may happened down the road. For many buyers, the inspector can be one of the most important people they deal with. But many people who are thinking of buying a condo wonder whether an inspection is really necessary. It is a legitimate question, but one with only correct one answer: Yes.

Whether a condo is a new construction or you are buying it from a previous owner, you should have a qualified inspector look at it. Having an inspection report in your hands gives you a measure of comfort that you are getting what you think you are getting.

Just because a condo is located in a large building and a bunch of other people already live there, you should not assume all is well and good (even though, in most cases, it will be). In this case, it pays to be just a little bit on the cynical side. Inspectors can also identify any faulty wiring, a dryer that is not properly vented, or a toilet that needs to be replaced. They may be an investment of several hundred dollars on the front end, but they can be a real money—and time-saver in the long run. And, as with any type of home, you as a buyer can request the seller fix any issues identified in the inspection. (The sellers may not agree to make the changes, but it never hurts to try.)

building inspectionJust because your condo is part of a larger building does not mean you can afford to not have the structural inspection. The inspector should look at the walls and ceiling, as well as the outside walls, to give you a heads-up if you may encounter any problems. Additionally, inspectors typically look at the major appliances in a home, including air conditioner, furnace, water heater, washer, dryer, refrigerator, dishwasher, and microwave. Inspectors also will check the plumbing and make sure the disposal in the sink if functioning properly. visit us on http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-connecticut-concrete-congress-amendements-20170914-story.html

In short, there is no reason to treat the purchase of a condo any differently than you would the purchase of a single-family home. Having a qualified structural inspection go through can alert you to things you may have missed when you first went through and can alert you to things that are either dangerous or that could be large expenses down the road.